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Nov. 10, 2021

#45 Fostering to Adopt Type 1 Diabetes with Sarah Vaughan

#45 Fostering to Adopt Type 1 Diabetes with Sarah Vaughan

In episode 45, Sarah Vaughan tells her beautiful and heartwarming story of fostering to adopt a daughter with type 1 diabetes AND her little sister. This one is just sweet and good for the soul. Enjoy!

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Below you will find a transcription of this episode. This transcription was created by an automated, electronic service that is based off of an uploaded audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some instances it is not correct or is incomplete due to inaudible portions of the recording or due to computer-based transcription errors. The transcriptions should never be treated as an authoritative document or record. Again, nothing that you hear or read on this website, in the show notes or in a blog post should be considered medical advice or advice in any way, shape or form. Always consult your physician before making any changes to the way you manage your or someone else’s health. Please see a full account of our disclaimers and disclosers HERE.

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Transcript

Katie:

This is episode 45 of the sugar mamas podcast. And today I get to talk with Sarah. Sarah is going to tell us her family's amazing and heartwarming story of fostering to adopt that involves type one diabetes. I know you guys are going to love this conversation. Enjoy. You're listening to the sugar mamas podcast, a show designed for moms and caregivers of type one diabetics here. You'll find a community of like-minded people who are striving daily to keep their kids safe, happy, and healthy in the ever-changing world of type one. I'm your host and fellow T one D mom, Katie Roseboro. Before we get started. I need you to know that nothing you hear on the sugar mamas podcast should be considered medical advice. Please be safe, be smart, and always consult your physician before making changes to the way you manage type one diabetes. Thanks.

Sarah:

all right. Well, my name is Sarah. I am from a small town in Mississippi. I'm about 30 minutes outside of Starkville, and I am married to my wonderful husband, Paul and we have three kids. Um, Kaylin is our oldest she's 12, and then Shea is a little. And we adopted them this summer from foster care. And then we also have a six month old and our oldest Caitlyn who's 12. She's the one that has type one diabetes.

Katie:

Okay. So you guys have quite the story of fostering to adoption and it involves type one. So walk us through just the process of fostering to adopting your type one diabetic and her little sister.

Sarah:

okay. So I was a public school teacher and my husband and I were dating at the time. And I taught this precious little girl who is in Boster care. And it was Caitlin's little sister Shay. And I taught her in second grade and I always had wanted to foster. They were in the foster care system and she was just that kid. That just like grabs your heart. Um, there was just something different about her. And I would tell Paul all the time I was like, I just. That there's something different about this kid. Um, so we met through that year of teaching and I always told my principal, if they ever need a home, please let me know. And my husband and I got married that spring of 2018, and I ended up moving school districts because we got married. Um, but that December, we got a call letting us know that Shay and her older sister, Caitlin were going to need a new foster home. And so we got licensed as quick as we could. And, um, that was before we had even been married for a year. So the girls came April 1st, 2019, and then our one-year wedding anniversary was the next week. And so they came in, um, and their plan was to reunify, back with their birth family, but that just didn't happen. And

Katie:

Yeah.

Sarah:

we ended up actually getting to adopt them this summer, but they were in foster care for.

Katie:

Yeah. Did they go in and out of the foster care system? I mean, and in the process of trying to re reunite them.

Sarah:

It pretty consistent. They were just, they came into the system when they were around the age of eight and seven, and then they never went back home. So they had visits, but, but they stayed in the system.

Katie:

Okay. So Caitlin, right. She's the

Sarah:

Yes.

Katie:

Okay. So when was she diagnosed with.

Sarah:

So she was diagnosed with type one when she was. and then came into foster care when she was eight. So she had two years with her birth family. Um, and there was, there was still a lot of neglect in the home and so her diabetes was not managed. Um, so I knew that she was a diabetic. I don't think it really hit me until like the day before they came that, oh, tomorrow, like I'm going to have. A girl with something that could potentially kill her in my home. And I don't know how to manage this. And, um, my sister is a registered dietician, so that was super helpful for me. I like called her the day before. Um, didn't know what equipment Kaitlin had. I didn't know, um, about, I just knew that if she got low, I was to give her a Capri sign and that's about all I knew. Um, and so it was a little scary.

Katie:

Yeah. So how did, I mean, so most of us, when our kids get diagnosed, we land ourselves in the hospital. That's typically how it happens. So we spend a couple of days in the hospital getting educated by the endocrinologist and the, you know, certified diabetes care and education specialist. And we have like, they call it diabetes school. Um, and it's, you know, basically 48 hours. All you can learn about diabetes. So how did, how did that look for you? Because I'm assuming you weren't in the hospital with her at first, correct. Okay.

Sarah:

Yeah. Yeah. So ha before she came to me, Caitlin had been in two diabetic comas. Um, so she was in one when she first found out she had. Diabetes when she was six. And then when they came into foster care at the age of eight, she was actually brought into foster care from the hospital. Um, she was in her second one just because it was so, um, ill managed. So I called down to her endocrinologist and they were like, we can get you in tomorrow. So she came April 1st and then we can get you in April 2nd to come and sit down with someone and talk about it. And so I was like, okay, I've got to keep this girl alive for 24 hours. Um, so when they bring you a child in foster care who has diabetes, I'm sure it's different in every case, but in our case she was 10 and they said, here's her stuff. She knows how to handle. See you later. Um, that was about my training. And so she didn't have an ex-com, she didn't have a pump. She just had, um, her stuff to do fingersticks her, uh, insulin shots. And that was about all we had. And so she was very independent with it and she didn't know how to handle a lot, which was great. Um, But we were just kind of in survival mode until the next day I sat down with the endocrinologist for about an hour or two and they gave me some packets of stuff and we were on our way.

Katie:

Oh, well, so sorry. The timeline is, you know, uh, with everything is, um, I just want to make sure she was, you said she was diagnosed at six, went into foster care at eight, and then by the time she got to you, she was 10 ish. 10, 10. Okay. Wow. Okay. Okay. So Yeah. So she knew, I mean, my daughter is nine and I, I mean, she's fairly independent. I feel like if she got dropped off in the middle of a forest, she could probably survive for, you know, 48 hours on her own at least. But, um, but still, I mean, she doesn't have, she didn't have any of the, you know, fancy tools that most of us have today, CGMs and pumps. And, um, and like you said, Prior to this, her diabetes wasn't managed very well. So there was probably a lot that you both had to learn obviously to get her, um, to, uh, a better place. Um, I'm just curious, does She have a pumper Dexcom now?

Sarah:

She does. So after a little bit less than a year of being with us, we were able to get a Dexcom, which was a huge help. And then, um, this spring we got, uh, So that has been a game changer for us. And so it was really nice that she knew how to do a lot, but I felt like we kind of had to go in reverse a little bit because she had been doing things wrong. Um, and so we're at the felt like a typical child, you would teach them indigenous. With their diabetes. We had to like teach her dependence on us, um, with diabetes and then, and then go forward. And so, um, just things that weren't being done correctly, like we didn't use an alcohol wipe before we did a finger stick or before we did an insulin shot.

Katie:

Um,

Sarah:

she just had never done that. so things like that, that we just had to relearn, you know, correct ways to do.

Katie:

was she pretty, pretty receptive to kind of learning the new way and getting help from you?

Sarah:

Kind of a lot of times she was like, well, I've lived this long and it hasn't bothered me, you know? So we kind of had to have some sit downs about how,

Katie:

I know.

Sarah:

the Lord has kept you safe for this long, but we're going to. Take an extra step at work in the white, down with an alcohol wipe just in case. And so, um, we, we, it was a learning adjustment for a little bit, but

Katie:

Yeah, that's such, it's so hard. It's such a fine line of like trying to stress to them that this is really important and can lead to serious complications down the line and, you know, wanting them to be educated and motivated to take care of themselves, but also not just scaring them to death. You know what I mean? I try not to use scare tactics with my daughter, but it's just, you know, it's so hard sometimes. Cause you just want to be like, this is so important. Like,

Sarah:

Yes, it's hard to find that balance. And I think her other foster parents hadn't always handled it the best. It was kind of more. Um, she would get a different dessert than everybody else, that kind of thing. And I think they had really good intentions, she always felt really ostracized, um, for her type one. And so, the other thing we dealt with it was a little bit of an adjustment was food struggles. typically in foster care food hoarding is a big deal, um, because there's not enough food in the home. And then you add in diabetes with that and you cut things out because of that, uh, that was a learning adjustment too, is we've had to work a lot on food regulation and, um, the importance of not binge eating certain foods, you know, or.

Katie:

Yeah. Yeah. I've heard, I've heard that about like a few of my friends that foster, they, know, they, they say that that's typically something they see is that, you know, all of a sudden these not always in a foster home, but if somebody is, you know, has the means, like there's all of a sudden they're presented with all this food. And so they'll, they'll binge eat it. Cause they think like they might never see it again. Or they just don't know when the next stable meals gonna be just breaks my heart breaks. Yeah, this is kind of a personal question, but did you, did you guys do any type of counseling as a, as a family or did, did Kaylin do any counseling?

Sarah:

so the girl started counseling a few months into being with us. I that they were going to want them to go into counseling when, um, their plan changed to adoption. And so I took the initiative and I was like, I want to find them a good counselor. I don't really want the foster care system to find them a good counselor. so. Knew someone and she's a Christian and has worked with kids, um, and kind of a foster care type of setting here in Mississippi. And so I had asked her, and so she did counseling with the girls weekly, and most of Kailyn's was discussing food and diabetes.

Katie:

Yeah. Yeah. That's, that's probably a good idea, especially cause she's 12 now. So I, you know, I feel like the teenage years present problems in, and of themselves with body image and food issues, not always, but, um, does she still,

Sarah:

parties and stuff like that, you know?

Katie:

Oh yeah, definitely. So I'm just, I'm curious when you sign up to be a foster parent, do you. Specify whether or not you are willing or even able to take care of somebody with a chronic medical condition, or is it just all or nothing?

Sarah:

typically they'll call you for anything. Um, there is a type of foster care that's like more specialized or special needs. Um, but from what I've seen, that kind of goes more into like, Severe disabilities type of special needs. Um, not really like something like diabetes. And so may I saw the other day on a Facebook page. I was in that they needed a home for a three-year-old who has type one. Um, and they were just trying to look for somebody. And so a lot of times you're just thrown it overnight. And, um, you just pray that you can get in with a good doctor and learn all the, all the little tips and tricks along the way.

Katie:

Yeah, absolutely. I mean, I feel like your situation. I mean, we're all kind of thrown into it when you get the type one diagnosis, but your situation is definitely different because not only are you thrown that, but you're also, you know, you're bringing new personalities into your house and that's, that's hard and that's, uh, that's definitely an adjustment for everybody. Are you guys still fostering?

Sarah:

Um, our CLA our house houses on what's called deferral right now. So we're taking like a six month break because we just had a baby. so when we got the girls, uh, we had been walking through and fertility, and then it was real neat. We. This, I guess 2020 during COVID. Um, I was able to have a procedure done and got pregnant and, uh, he had a baby this spring. So right now we're on deferral. We fostered five kids total. So we've kept the girls and we've had three that have been in and out of our home. Um, and then we'll, we'll go back on the list, but we just needed a little break.

Katie:

Oh, totally understand that. First of all, congratulations, that's very

Sarah:

Thank you.

Katie:

guys just had a baby or the older girls adjusting well to having a six month old in the house.

Sarah:

Oh, yes, they're all about it. That's been great. I told my mom, I was like, I'm spoiled because I have helpers with the baby. And so I don't know what it's like to have a, you know, our family is kind of reverse. So we have our biological child is younger than our adopted kids. And so, um, I've never had to deal with a newborn phase without having helpers around. A huge blessing,

Katie:

Oh, my gosh.

Sarah:

they love, they spoil that baby way too much.

Katie:

bet. That's so fun. Is it? Is the baby a boy or a girl?

Sarah:

It's a girl. So we are full of girls, my poor husband.

Katie:

Yeah, bless his heart. Do you have any animals that are males?

Sarah:

Um, we have one dog that has a male. We have another dog is a girl. So

Katie:

Yeah, he's definitely. He's definitely outnumbered for sure. Well, what, I'm just, I'm curious about your school situation. Are you homeschooling them or are

Sarah:

So

Katie:

yeah.

Sarah:

yeah, we are homeschool and this year, um, so in foster care they have to be in public or private school. Um, I noticed though, like her diabetes was so much easier to manage when we were on virtual. COVID happened. We went virtual and I was like, oh man, it's so much easier to manage everything. Cause they can get a. Move around their sugars go going high or, um, so we were in school. I was a public school teacher for five years, and then this year we were homeschooling. Um, so the girls Kaylin's in seventh grade and then my other one is in fifth grade and the baby just cheers him on

Katie:

Oh, my gosh. I love that so much. That's great. Are you doing like a virtual school? Like a, not a, um, not like a COVID virtual school, but like an online virtual school or do you have like a different curriculum that you use?

Sarah:

We have a mixture of curriculums we use. So I was actually homeschooled K through 12, um, and always kind of knew I wanted to homeschool. I just went the teacher route until the Lord opened up the doors for us to do that. it worked out cause we met our kids that way.

Katie:

Yeah.

Sarah:

so they love it. They love that they get done with school early. So they're working on school right now. And then I've been kind of checking it up throughout the morning, but they would use a different variety of.

Katie:

Okay. Yeah. I've man. I went into a panic when we had to go virtual for the pandemic, because I just, I know the virtual pandemic virtual is very different than like a traditional homeschool setting. And we just did not do well with virtual pandemic virtual. And there was many times. I was messaging all my homeschool friends. Like tell me what curriculums you're using, because we might be switching. Like, I cannot do this again. it was just hard and it wasn't the teacher's fault cause they were, they didn't know what they were doing either. You know what I mean? Everybody was, just thrown into it.

Sarah:

was in like survival mode. I feel like. And I was like pregnant at the time and we're trying to do virtual and not all kids have internet. And I was like, this is crazy, but

Katie:

Yeah, absolutely. All right. Well tell me, so, oh, well she's home now, but, uh, I was just going to ask about school and everything, but that, that doesn't apply in this situation cause she's at home and you can just walk into the next room and

Sarah:

true.

Katie:

Yeah, that's awesome. I feel like there's probably some parents out there who are considering adopting and fostering. They already most likely have a type one in their home, but just what of advice encouragement do you have for anybody who's considering that Hey guys, time for the product feature of the week. Today's product feature is the Darrio blood glucose monitor. You guys. This thing is seriously, so cool. You got to go check it out. I'm going to put an affiliate link in the show notes to Amazon where you can buy it for just $25. What is it? You might be. It turns your phone into a blood glucose meter. It's compact, it's portable. It's easy to use, even if you have a blood glucose meter that you love and trust how awesome to have this affordable, portable meter that you can have in your purse in case of emergencies, like you forgot your whole kit at home or something along those lines. And it literally just plugs into the bottom of your smart. It's compatible with most devices. Go check it out. Link in the show notes. Have you checked out? Buy me a coffee. Now there's a no strings attached way for listeners like you to support the show, your gift can be a one-time donation, or you can become a sugar mommas podcast by me. Member there's different levels of membership starting at just $1 a month. And of course the membership levels have super fun names. Like the bronze bolus level, the silver sugar's level, the golden glucose level and the diamond diabetic level to find out more, go to buy me a coffee.com forward slash sugar. Mama. There'll be a link in the show notes. Thanks you guys now back to the show.

Sarah:

my advice would be go with your gut. And so I think that I don't think everybody is called to foster or adopt. Um, but I think that sometimes, so coming from a Christian perspective, I think sometimes the Lord places, something on your heart for a reason. So I always knew that I wanted to foster. Um, and then it just grew over the years, my husband, uh, was not really sure about it. He didn't know a lot about it. And so we just had lots of conversations and, um, when we had walked through two miscarriages, my sister-in-law said maybe God's plan is different from your family, for your family. Then yours is. And we just started praying about it. And then literally we started having people ask us about what about the student at school? may need a foster family. Could you do it? Like, and then it ended up that child didn't need a home. Um, and then we got the call about the girls. And so just giving your yes. Um, even if the unknowns are a little scary, um, there's a lot of myths about foster care. And so I just tell people to ask people who are foster. Um, to really get the inside scoop because a lot people sidewalk couldn't afford it. Um, well that's not really an issue with foster care most of the time. Um, there's there's ways that it can be made affordable. And so, yeah, be open, look at your family situation, you know, and be wise about the kids you may already have in your own home you're considering ages, but you can request like certain ages, um, that would work best for your family. Or you can say, Hey, we can only take. So we have three girls. Um, we have right now, we'll probably just open back up our home to only girls that are below a certain age. Um, just to be wise considering our own family. it is, you will be blessed way more than you bless other people, because it is a, you just learn a lot. It's a humbling experience and we love it. We love just taking kids in and showing them family. Um, it's been a fun adventure.

Katie:

Yeah, gosh, you guys definitely have the heart for it. And, you know, when, when you were teaching and you had Shea in your class and you know, you just out to your principal and said, Hey, if girls ever need a home, let me know. Um, I feel like for you, it just, the, you know, few minutes I've been talking to you, it probably didn't matter. But did you know at the time that Caitlin had type one.

Sarah:

I did. I met one. Um, and that's all I really knew was that she had type one and, uh, looking back, I don't think I realized how much of our life it would consume, which may be the Lord's grace. It was a good thing that I didn't know, you know, at the time how severe it would be at points. Um, but yeah, I knew that she had had.

Katie:

Yeah. I don't think anybody knows, you know, people I see in these social media groups, people get upset when, you know, people that don't have to deal with type one everyday, say things like, oh, it's just diabetes. Like, you know, at least it's manageable. Like they just, just don't know. Like, unless you're, unless you're living it day in and day out, you don't really realize the, the amount of 24 7 vigilance. It requires and, um, just to keep things in check. So, and I feel like, you know, the same, the same went for me before my daughter got diagnosed. I, I probably would've said the same thing. Like, oh, well, at least it's not this. Or at least it's not that. And, um, uh, yeah, it probably was the Lord's grace just keeping you from knowing too much at the time.

Sarah:

Yes. Yes. That's an adjustment. And let me tell you, when you get to the teen years, hormones

Katie:

Hmm.

Sarah:

I never thought that would be a thing. We're walking through puberty, right. Puberty right now. And that has it changes, you know, your blood sugar just will run half for no reason. And so we kind of have a different insulin schedule when we're on our cycle than we do when we're not on our cycle, but that has been something I would have never thought, you know,

Katie:

Yeah. Oh yeah. I know, We, I had a talk about that with the endocrinologist. Last time we went, my daughter's only nine, but she just went through a big growth spurt. So the endocrinologist is asking about like, oh, maybe this is starting like, you know, pre, pre, pre, pre puberty. And I was like, no way. Um, but I feel like that's probably not wrong. I feel like we're coming up on those years really quickly. And I've noticed that like, It seems like every month, there's a week where she'll run high. And then right after that she'll run low and I'm like, I bet her body is getting ready. for

Sarah:

ready.

Katie:

all of that.

Sarah:

We noticed that around, like, uh you'll if you have a Dexcom, one thing that's been really interesting is around like two to 3:00 AM. Uh, we'll start to run high, so we'll be like level all night. Everything's great. And then around two to three, am it just like all of a sudden starts to spike up and that's apparently, apparently adviser and some hormone stuff around that time and it's normal, but it's crazy. Yeah. The, you just don't think about that being an issue with that.

Katie:

I know, I know, I didn't think about half of things when we first got diagnosed, I'm like, oh, so pretty much every single thing in life affects your blood sugar. The way the wind is blowing that. day, whatever it may be. Yes. Yeah, absolutely. Well, Sarah, thank you so much for coming on today. I've really enjoyed chatting with you and learning about your, your story. Is there anything else you want to let the listeners know?

Sarah:

I think that's it. It has been, you know, it's been a learning experience, but I think if you're with fostering and then also with diabetes, I think when you're open to learn about it, it's definitely possible. You know, it's, it's not, it's a little scary at first. Um, but then that community has just been huge, you know, finding those people who support you and encourage you. Um, that has been a game changer for us is just not walking through it alone.

Katie:

Yeah, absolutely. Do you just, are you just part of support groups online or do you guys do any sort of, you know, support groups or JDRF or anything else? Local?

Sarah:

So we're in a couple of support groups online. And then, um, just some local friends have been huge for us, just. You know, thinking and checking in on Caitlin and they make a big deal about, you know, and she has a sticker for her Omni pod or, you know, things like that, encouraging things. Um, and then I have a few friends who are type ones and so just really reaching out to them and, there's such a need for good foster families too. And so on the foster care front, you know, there's, I don't know about every state, but in Mississippi, there's such a need for foster families you know, their kids are needing placements left and right. And so. Um, just that encouragement, you know, that you can do it and, uh, listen, listen to that inner push that you feel.

Katie:

Yeah, I have you heard of the Isaiah one 17.

Sarah:

No.

Katie:

Okay. You'll have to look that up. It's started in Tennessee and the lady's name that set started. It is escaping my brain at the moment. Um, I'm gonna look it up really quickly, Okay, her name is Rhonda Paulson. So the it's I love her story. When you were telling, talking about your husband, like not being. Super sure about whether or not fostering was the right thing for you guys. I was thinking about her because she has the most hilarious story about how she, she just felt really called to foster and possibly even adopt. And she brought it up to her husband and he was like, Absolutely not. And so of course she started praying about it. And anyway, long story short, she like tricked him in to going to like, not even like a meeting about fostering. It was like, she signed them up for the class to become foster parents. And he, he went and was totally so mad about it. And then, but at the end he's like, well, now that I've gone and heard what I've heard, like I, can't not. Do this. So they finished the whole course. They ended up fostering. You know, again, very long story, but she started, what's called the Isaiah one 17 house, which is a, they're building one in my city right now, which I think is awesome. But it's like a, it's like a safe home for kids that are taken, that are removed from their own home and are getting, are waiting, awaiting placement in the foster care system. And they rather than having to sit in the social workers. They can go and sit in like it, or just be in this house with a hot shower and a hot meal and toys and a bed. And they can wait there rather than in like a cold, a cold, a social worker offices. So

Sarah:

That's huge. I actually, I have a picture of our girls from, that had been sent to me by my coworker who alerted me when they needed a new foster home. And they were sitting in the office and she said they had texted her. And they were like, we don't know where we're going to go. I guess nobody wants us, you know, cause it is, it's hard for them. They were removed from that home that foster parent, um, had called him. Like, I really need them to go ahead and move tomorrow. And I think she just kinda wanted to rip the bandaid off and it was, it was a good foster home. They just knew it wasn't be permanent. And it was the day after Christmas, you know? So they got, they got all their Christmas gifts the day before, and then 26, they found out that the place that they thought they were going to be at, you know, they'd been there for over a year. Um, they were going to have to leave a little bit, so they just, yeah. Hung out in the foster care office, hoping that they would have somewhere to go. And so. It's hard, you know, and then for those, I was thinking about this when you were asking what I could tell other people. I think, you know, if you're in a place and you can't foster, I think looking at what can you do? You know, as, as a foster FA you know, to support foster families and for us, huge things have been just like meals, that people bring, especially when you get a placement, um, Close a lot of times the kids come with nothing. So our girls have been in foster care for a while, stayed a fair amount, but I mean, we got another placement and he came with nothing except for what he was wearing. Um, and that's a lot to have to come up with overnight. And so I don't think everyone is called to be foster parents, but I do think that is called to help out. Orphans, which is basically what foster kids are, you know, and, and support those families is huge. You know, don't underestimate taking a pizza to somebody.

Katie:

Yeah, absolutely. that's another thing that this Isaiah one 17 house does, is it, it takes donations from the community. And so they've got diapers and food and clothes for these kids when they come into the house. And Yeah. so they're not. They might be coming in with nothing, but they're not leaving with nothing. So it's pretty awesome. You should look it up. I think they're, yeah, they're spreading. It's pretty new. I think she just started it like a couple of years ago. Um, so it's kind of slowly spreading across the country, but yeah, they're um, the one that they're building in my city just got, um, funded. So they're, they're going to start the construction process and we've been helping out a little bit, not. And there's, you know, there's no house to volunteer in yet, but we've just been helping out with like fundraising and stuff like that, because, well, I don't know that my family is called to foster, at least not at this point in time. I definitely yeah. Feel the, the nudge to help in some way. so it's been a good way for us to get involved in that. Well, Sarah, thank you again. I've loved chatting with you. You have such a calm, demeanor.

Sarah:

Thank you.

Katie:

You're welcome.

Sarah:

I think the Lord has had to prepare that. So my husband and I, we laugh because we're 28 and 26 and we have a 12 year old and 11 year old and a six month old and setting the girls have been with us like a week. And my husband was like, feel like I've aged 10 years.

Katie:

Yeah.

Sarah:

And we just, you know, we just have, and it's fine. We, I feel like I have such a neat relationship with the girls, you know, because we're so close in age, but

Katie:

Yeah.

Sarah:

I don't mind chatting anytime.

Katie:

Yeah. Okay. Well, thanks. If I have any other, any other fostering questions, I'll definitely reach out or type one because I've got a girl that's coming up on our teen years. So I'm going to need the advice of the moms that have come before me. So

Sarah:

Oh,

Katie:

I'm actually going to do a teen series starting at the first of the year, uh, after the first of the year, I've got a teen series coming out.

Sarah:

it. She turns 13 December 3rd. So that'd be

Katie:

Ooh, yes, girl tune in. All right. So you have a fabulous.

Sarah:

Thank you.

Katie:

That is it for our show today. And Sarah, I just want to thank you so much again for coming on. I really loved hearing your story. Thank you so much for sharing it. You are truly such an inspiration to parents in general and the type one community also listeners. Don't forget if you want to be on the show. If you think you'd make a great guest and have a story to tell, then contact me. You can email me@sugarmommaspodcastatgmail.com or you can head on over to the web. At www dot sugar, mommas podcast.com and click on the contact tab. There's a short form to fill out and it will send an email directly to me. Let me know. I'd love to chat. Don't forget to subscribe to the show. You can easily do that on the website, and don't forget to spread the word. Share with. If this episode or this podcast has been encouraging to you, let others know about it, share it with your friends, with your online support groups, with your endocrinologist. Whoever's willing to listen about the world of type one. All right. You guys have a fabulous week. We're coming up on the holidays. I mean, we've already done one holiday, right? Halloween's out of the way. We've just got Thanksgiving and Christmas to go chat with you soon. Bye.